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Mountain moon and & cloud by (justb)
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fabriciomora:

Design proposal by Skidmore Owings & Merrill for Obama’s Presidential Library at Chicago Lakeside - Visualization by WAX
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archatlas:

House in Villarcayo Pereda Pérez Arquitectos
archatlas:

House in Villarcayo Pereda Pérez Arquitectos
archatlas:

House in Villarcayo Pereda Pérez Arquitectos
archatlas:

House in Villarcayo Pereda Pérez Arquitectos
archatlas:

House in Villarcayo Pereda Pérez Arquitectos
archatlas:

House in Villarcayo Pereda Pérez Arquitectos
archatlas:

House in Villarcayo Pereda Pérez Arquitectos
archatlas:

House in Villarcayo Pereda Pérez Arquitectos
archatlas:

House in Villarcayo Pereda Pérez Arquitectos
archatlas:

House in Villarcayo Pereda Pérez Arquitectos
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nonconcept:

Tigh Port na Long, Scottland, UK by Dualchas Architects. (Photography: Andre Lee)
nonconcept:

Tigh Port na Long, Scottland, UK by Dualchas Architects. (Photography: Andre Lee)
nonconcept:

Tigh Port na Long, Scottland, UK by Dualchas Architects. (Photography: Andre Lee)
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archatlas:

Shrine of the Virgin of “La Antigua” in Alberite Otxotorena Arquitectos
archatlas:

Shrine of the Virgin of “La Antigua” in Alberite Otxotorena Arquitectos
archatlas:

Shrine of the Virgin of “La Antigua” in Alberite Otxotorena Arquitectos
archatlas:

Shrine of the Virgin of “La Antigua” in Alberite Otxotorena Arquitectos
archatlas:

Shrine of the Virgin of “La Antigua” in Alberite Otxotorena Arquitectos
archatlas:

Shrine of the Virgin of “La Antigua” in Alberite Otxotorena Arquitectos
archatlas:

Shrine of the Virgin of “La Antigua” in Alberite Otxotorena Arquitectos
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architorturedsouls:

M.H. de Young Museum / Herzog & de Meuron
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dezeen:

Architect Simon Astridge employed a varied material palette of plywood, concrete, brick and stone to create this extension to a Victorian terraced house in London »
dezeen:

Architect Simon Astridge employed a varied material palette of plywood, concrete, brick and stone to create this extension to a Victorian terraced house in London »
dezeen:

Architect Simon Astridge employed a varied material palette of plywood, concrete, brick and stone to create this extension to a Victorian terraced house in London »
dezeen:

Architect Simon Astridge employed a varied material palette of plywood, concrete, brick and stone to create this extension to a Victorian terraced house in London »
dezeen:

Architect Simon Astridge employed a varied material palette of plywood, concrete, brick and stone to create this extension to a Victorian terraced house in London »
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remash:

hover house ~ bower architecture
remash:

hover house ~ bower architecture
remash:

hover house ~ bower architecture
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arqbto:

Parroquia San Josemaría Escrivá — Javier Sordo Madaleno (2009)
Santa Fe, Ciudad de México.
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thechemistryset:

Music School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, 1974
(Photographs: Peter Cook)
thechemistryset:

Music School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, 1974
(Photographs: Peter Cook)
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worclip:

Pobble House (2013) by Guy Hollaway Architects
Photographed by Charles Hosea
Location: Ashford, Kent, England

Owing to the site’s significance, local planning policy dictates that any new building must replace an existing one and is to be of similar scale and proportion to that of the original. The design response from GHA to the clent’s brief was to create an architecture that understands ‘place’. To this end a material palette was chosen that would enhance with age, inspired by Dungeness. Whilst being designed to an incredibly tight budget of under £250,000, the building has a very high quality and robust nature to withstand the harsh climate.
To reduce the building’s impact on the natural shingle, it sits on a series of pad foundations which elevates the house off the beach, suspended by half a metre (1.64 feet). The timber frame construction is sealed by a rubber waterproofing layer that acts as a whole house gutter, allowing the rain to fall through the batten over-cladding and down the building. The three modules of the building are each enveloped in separate materials, a Core-ten steel mesh, Larch, and robust cement fibre board that will each act as rain-shields. The building is extremely durable, an important aspect considering the harsh climate and exposed setting. The exposure will cause the larch and core ten to weather silver and red respectively, an echo to the natural landscape. The building has been designed to be as energy efficient as possible.
worclip:

Pobble House (2013) by Guy Hollaway Architects
Photographed by Charles Hosea
Location: Ashford, Kent, England

Owing to the site’s significance, local planning policy dictates that any new building must replace an existing one and is to be of similar scale and proportion to that of the original. The design response from GHA to the clent’s brief was to create an architecture that understands ‘place’. To this end a material palette was chosen that would enhance with age, inspired by Dungeness. Whilst being designed to an incredibly tight budget of under £250,000, the building has a very high quality and robust nature to withstand the harsh climate.
To reduce the building’s impact on the natural shingle, it sits on a series of pad foundations which elevates the house off the beach, suspended by half a metre (1.64 feet). The timber frame construction is sealed by a rubber waterproofing layer that acts as a whole house gutter, allowing the rain to fall through the batten over-cladding and down the building. The three modules of the building are each enveloped in separate materials, a Core-ten steel mesh, Larch, and robust cement fibre board that will each act as rain-shields. The building is extremely durable, an important aspect considering the harsh climate and exposed setting. The exposure will cause the larch and core ten to weather silver and red respectively, an echo to the natural landscape. The building has been designed to be as energy efficient as possible.
worclip:

Pobble House (2013) by Guy Hollaway Architects
Photographed by Charles Hosea
Location: Ashford, Kent, England

Owing to the site’s significance, local planning policy dictates that any new building must replace an existing one and is to be of similar scale and proportion to that of the original. The design response from GHA to the clent’s brief was to create an architecture that understands ‘place’. To this end a material palette was chosen that would enhance with age, inspired by Dungeness. Whilst being designed to an incredibly tight budget of under £250,000, the building has a very high quality and robust nature to withstand the harsh climate.
To reduce the building’s impact on the natural shingle, it sits on a series of pad foundations which elevates the house off the beach, suspended by half a metre (1.64 feet). The timber frame construction is sealed by a rubber waterproofing layer that acts as a whole house gutter, allowing the rain to fall through the batten over-cladding and down the building. The three modules of the building are each enveloped in separate materials, a Core-ten steel mesh, Larch, and robust cement fibre board that will each act as rain-shields. The building is extremely durable, an important aspect considering the harsh climate and exposed setting. The exposure will cause the larch and core ten to weather silver and red respectively, an echo to the natural landscape. The building has been designed to be as energy efficient as possible.
worclip:

Pobble House (2013) by Guy Hollaway Architects
Photographed by Charles Hosea
Location: Ashford, Kent, England

Owing to the site’s significance, local planning policy dictates that any new building must replace an existing one and is to be of similar scale and proportion to that of the original. The design response from GHA to the clent’s brief was to create an architecture that understands ‘place’. To this end a material palette was chosen that would enhance with age, inspired by Dungeness. Whilst being designed to an incredibly tight budget of under £250,000, the building has a very high quality and robust nature to withstand the harsh climate.
To reduce the building’s impact on the natural shingle, it sits on a series of pad foundations which elevates the house off the beach, suspended by half a metre (1.64 feet). The timber frame construction is sealed by a rubber waterproofing layer that acts as a whole house gutter, allowing the rain to fall through the batten over-cladding and down the building. The three modules of the building are each enveloped in separate materials, a Core-ten steel mesh, Larch, and robust cement fibre board that will each act as rain-shields. The building is extremely durable, an important aspect considering the harsh climate and exposed setting. The exposure will cause the larch and core ten to weather silver and red respectively, an echo to the natural landscape. The building has been designed to be as energy efficient as possible.
worclip:

Pobble House (2013) by Guy Hollaway Architects
Photographed by Charles Hosea
Location: Ashford, Kent, England

Owing to the site’s significance, local planning policy dictates that any new building must replace an existing one and is to be of similar scale and proportion to that of the original. The design response from GHA to the clent’s brief was to create an architecture that understands ‘place’. To this end a material palette was chosen that would enhance with age, inspired by Dungeness. Whilst being designed to an incredibly tight budget of under £250,000, the building has a very high quality and robust nature to withstand the harsh climate.
To reduce the building’s impact on the natural shingle, it sits on a series of pad foundations which elevates the house off the beach, suspended by half a metre (1.64 feet). The timber frame construction is sealed by a rubber waterproofing layer that acts as a whole house gutter, allowing the rain to fall through the batten over-cladding and down the building. The three modules of the building are each enveloped in separate materials, a Core-ten steel mesh, Larch, and robust cement fibre board that will each act as rain-shields. The building is extremely durable, an important aspect considering the harsh climate and exposed setting. The exposure will cause the larch and core ten to weather silver and red respectively, an echo to the natural landscape. The building has been designed to be as energy efficient as possible.
worclip:

Pobble House (2013) by Guy Hollaway Architects
Photographed by Charles Hosea
Location: Ashford, Kent, England

Owing to the site’s significance, local planning policy dictates that any new building must replace an existing one and is to be of similar scale and proportion to that of the original. The design response from GHA to the clent’s brief was to create an architecture that understands ‘place’. To this end a material palette was chosen that would enhance with age, inspired by Dungeness. Whilst being designed to an incredibly tight budget of under £250,000, the building has a very high quality and robust nature to withstand the harsh climate.
To reduce the building’s impact on the natural shingle, it sits on a series of pad foundations which elevates the house off the beach, suspended by half a metre (1.64 feet). The timber frame construction is sealed by a rubber waterproofing layer that acts as a whole house gutter, allowing the rain to fall through the batten over-cladding and down the building. The three modules of the building are each enveloped in separate materials, a Core-ten steel mesh, Larch, and robust cement fibre board that will each act as rain-shields. The building is extremely durable, an important aspect considering the harsh climate and exposed setting. The exposure will cause the larch and core ten to weather silver and red respectively, an echo to the natural landscape. The building has been designed to be as energy efficient as possible.
worclip:

Pobble House (2013) by Guy Hollaway Architects
Photographed by Charles Hosea
Location: Ashford, Kent, England

Owing to the site’s significance, local planning policy dictates that any new building must replace an existing one and is to be of similar scale and proportion to that of the original. The design response from GHA to the clent’s brief was to create an architecture that understands ‘place’. To this end a material palette was chosen that would enhance with age, inspired by Dungeness. Whilst being designed to an incredibly tight budget of under £250,000, the building has a very high quality and robust nature to withstand the harsh climate.
To reduce the building’s impact on the natural shingle, it sits on a series of pad foundations which elevates the house off the beach, suspended by half a metre (1.64 feet). The timber frame construction is sealed by a rubber waterproofing layer that acts as a whole house gutter, allowing the rain to fall through the batten over-cladding and down the building. The three modules of the building are each enveloped in separate materials, a Core-ten steel mesh, Larch, and robust cement fibre board that will each act as rain-shields. The building is extremely durable, an important aspect considering the harsh climate and exposed setting. The exposure will cause the larch and core ten to weather silver and red respectively, an echo to the natural landscape. The building has been designed to be as energy efficient as possible.
worclip:

Pobble House (2013) by Guy Hollaway Architects
Photographed by Charles Hosea
Location: Ashford, Kent, England

Owing to the site’s significance, local planning policy dictates that any new building must replace an existing one and is to be of similar scale and proportion to that of the original. The design response from GHA to the clent’s brief was to create an architecture that understands ‘place’. To this end a material palette was chosen that would enhance with age, inspired by Dungeness. Whilst being designed to an incredibly tight budget of under £250,000, the building has a very high quality and robust nature to withstand the harsh climate.
To reduce the building’s impact on the natural shingle, it sits on a series of pad foundations which elevates the house off the beach, suspended by half a metre (1.64 feet). The timber frame construction is sealed by a rubber waterproofing layer that acts as a whole house gutter, allowing the rain to fall through the batten over-cladding and down the building. The three modules of the building are each enveloped in separate materials, a Core-ten steel mesh, Larch, and robust cement fibre board that will each act as rain-shields. The building is extremely durable, an important aspect considering the harsh climate and exposed setting. The exposure will cause the larch and core ten to weather silver and red respectively, an echo to the natural landscape. The building has been designed to be as energy efficient as possible.
worclip:

Pobble House (2013) by Guy Hollaway Architects
Photographed by Charles Hosea
Location: Ashford, Kent, England

Owing to the site’s significance, local planning policy dictates that any new building must replace an existing one and is to be of similar scale and proportion to that of the original. The design response from GHA to the clent’s brief was to create an architecture that understands ‘place’. To this end a material palette was chosen that would enhance with age, inspired by Dungeness. Whilst being designed to an incredibly tight budget of under £250,000, the building has a very high quality and robust nature to withstand the harsh climate.
To reduce the building’s impact on the natural shingle, it sits on a series of pad foundations which elevates the house off the beach, suspended by half a metre (1.64 feet). The timber frame construction is sealed by a rubber waterproofing layer that acts as a whole house gutter, allowing the rain to fall through the batten over-cladding and down the building. The three modules of the building are each enveloped in separate materials, a Core-ten steel mesh, Larch, and robust cement fibre board that will each act as rain-shields. The building is extremely durable, an important aspect considering the harsh climate and exposed setting. The exposure will cause the larch and core ten to weather silver and red respectively, an echo to the natural landscape. The building has been designed to be as energy efficient as possible.
worclip:

Pobble House (2013) by Guy Hollaway Architects
Photographed by Charles Hosea
Location: Ashford, Kent, England

Owing to the site’s significance, local planning policy dictates that any new building must replace an existing one and is to be of similar scale and proportion to that of the original. The design response from GHA to the clent’s brief was to create an architecture that understands ‘place’. To this end a material palette was chosen that would enhance with age, inspired by Dungeness. Whilst being designed to an incredibly tight budget of under £250,000, the building has a very high quality and robust nature to withstand the harsh climate.
To reduce the building’s impact on the natural shingle, it sits on a series of pad foundations which elevates the house off the beach, suspended by half a metre (1.64 feet). The timber frame construction is sealed by a rubber waterproofing layer that acts as a whole house gutter, allowing the rain to fall through the batten over-cladding and down the building. The three modules of the building are each enveloped in separate materials, a Core-ten steel mesh, Larch, and robust cement fibre board that will each act as rain-shields. The building is extremely durable, an important aspect considering the harsh climate and exposed setting. The exposure will cause the larch and core ten to weather silver and red respectively, an echo to the natural landscape. The building has been designed to be as energy efficient as possible.